Press release

Over 2,400 people visited Cepsa’s San Roque facilities in 2018

21 Jan 2019

    • The goal of opening the company’s doors to the public is to establish an ongoing dialog to address their questions and concerns
    • As well as the company’s industrial facilities, visitors also had the opportunity to discover the roman ruins of Carteia and the Madrevieja environmental research center
    • The star attractions during visits were the Energy Campus and the World Wetlands Day itineraries

During 2018, 2,403 people visited Cepsa’s San Roque complex thanks to the itineraries that the company offers at its facilities over the course of the year. The open-door policy that Cepsa has always championed gives the public a chance to find out more about the company’s oil refining, petrochemical and energy activities in the district of Campo de Gibraltar, as well as its environmental conservation and protection work.

Cepsa’s annual program of visits kicked off at the start of the year with a new edition of the Energy Campus, with 697 children from twelve schools visiting Cepsa’s San Roque complex to discover everything about energy generation and consumption. That was followed in February with World Wetlands Day when 645 children from schools in Campo de Gibraltar got to see the Madrevieja environmental research center and take part in various environmental education workshops. Through these two initiatives, Cepsa aims to show kids from Algeciras Bay the conservation work that the company is doing.

General visits are also run for local community associations and groups of high-school pupils interested in finding out about Cepsa’s industrial facilities. Groups of university students also pay a visit, most of whom are on energy or occupational risk prevention courses. Anyone wishing to extend their visits are also able to take a tour of the archaeological site of Carteia or the Madrevieja environmental research center –two sites Cepsa has been involved in enhancing from an archaeological and environmental stand-point.

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